Vaccination and cancer


Annual vaccination is the norm. But, there is evidence that yearly vaccination may not be necessary, and could in fact be harmful. This is of especial note for you, since your cat will be strictly kept indoors. Ref: “Vaccination Schedule: Feline” by Dr Bob Rogers, Critter Fix Pet Hospital, USA (http://critterfixer.com/pages/feline.asp). Also, the substance traditionally used to carry the vaccine, the adjuvant, can cause cancer at the vaccination site. Vaccine Associated Sarcoma (VAS), or Feline Vaccine Sarcoma, is nearly always fatal: “In a symposium on fibrosarcomas in cats… , a professor of internal medicine at Colorado State University, asked attendees if they had seen a vaccine-associated feline sarcoma in the past two years. Roughly 80 percent raised their hands. Only a smattering went up when asked if they had successfully treated the cancer.” – Researchers Probe Vaccine-Associated Feline Sarcoma, Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 15 Sep 2004 (http://www.geocities.com/~kremersark/javma_9_2004.html)

This does not mean that your cat should not be vaccinated.Awareness is VITAL for you to make the proper decisions. Dr. Shane Ryan, Companion Animal Surgery clinic, Singapore, authored “Feline Vaccine Sarcoma”, an in-depth professional look. (Accessible through the clinic website – http://www.comvet.com/). And these online sites are by grieving pet-owners to tell their cats’ stories and alert others, and emphasise the need to be a pro-active partner with your vet in your cat’s healthcare:

Please also be aware that some animals develop reactions to vaccinations – from allergies, blisters, itching, sores, to fur loss (http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/petvacc.htm).

There is even a suspected case of brain damage induced by high fever caused by vaccination.

(Created: 21 Nov 06)

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One response to “Vaccination and cancer

  1. My cat of 9 yrs old survived fibrosarcoma. This cancer was 100% rabies vaccine induced. I got her from the shelter in 2001. She had her rabies shots before and after adoption. Moreover, my other cats had them as well.
    She had rabies shot (new formula that supposed to cause much less cases of cancer) in 2004.
    When I was petting her I noticed a bump half a size of a pea on her right hind leg in about 4 days. It kept growing very fast. It 4 additional days it amost doubled its size. I immeditely went to a vet and he had fine needle aspiration (not the best method). Pathology came back as infectious material. I went to another doctor within a week and had much larger sample taken for pathology reading. It came back as fibrosarcoma.
    I had results of the second finding run twice by different lab techs to make sure results were duplicated. Came back positive.
    I contacted best oncologists in USA by phone (one is Dr. Villalobos in CA) and email..they suggested amputation of her leg.
    I actually then visited oncologist at Alamo oncology center in CA.
    My cat’s leg was amputated within a month of finding a lump that kept growing in its size.
    After surgery I started my cat on Agaricus Blazei (ekismate) mushroom extract (once a day, before food, one or two small drops). I kept that routine for 4 mos-6 mos after the surgery. I found it on atlasworldusa.com. Actually it was recommended by Dr. Villalobos. I cannot say if it worked or if it did not. I made sure my cat had no reactions to it before I started her on it. They actually make pills but I wanted a liquid, so check with your doctor and do a research.
    Within a year after surgery I had a sonogram done to make sure cancer did not come back. My cat is officially cancer free.
    My cat does not have a leg but it is very healthy now. Please do not vaccinate indoor cats for rabies and leukemia, even with new so called improved vaccines. Keep them indoors. Both of these vaccines are responsible for fibrosarcoma-extremely invasive, fast spreading cancer in cats. Never vaccinate your cats in any other part of a body except hind legs. They can be amputated unlike kitty’s nape. Act fast, use your credit cards, stay positive and do a lot of research. Additionally, pet your animals and feel their skin for any growths. If you found a lump–go to your doctor! Good luck!

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